Ketogenic Diets and Physical Performance – Impaired physical performance is a common but not obligate result of a low carbohydrate diet. Lessons from traditional Inuit culture indicate that time for adaptation, optimized sodium and potassium nutriture, and constraint of protein to 15–25 % of daily energy expenditure allow unimpaired endurance performance despite nutritional ketosis. (http://nutritionandmetabolism.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1743-7075-1-2)
There are many top-rated exogenous ketone supplements, which is a great resource to help get your body to adapt faster and produce at a high-performance level, but you need to be careful how they can effect you and your energy levels and your general mood each day, so it’s important to check with your local physician and be safe about it. Remember that when you switch over to this diet, you must maintain high sodium levels during the process. It is recommended to add more 'keto salt' to your daily intake, starting off gradually and increasing it to as much as 500g a day. You need to add salt and electrolytes to your routine, because a person can lose levels through their urine, which causes your body to become more dehydrated and can leave you feeling a little sick and weak if you don't have the balance properly set up. Most exogenous ketone supplements we found have quite a bit of sodium in their ingredients, which helps you reach the level of salt intake you need each day. It is important to understand how this whole process works before even thinking about tackling it yourself. This is why you should consult with a professional to seek out advice and address any concerns that you may have before getting started.
Ketosis is a unique metabolic state where your body burns fat instead of glucose for fuel. Glucose is a simple sugar molecule derived from carbohydrates. Your body prefers using glucose to using fat and protein to make energy. This is because glucose it is easy to burn as it doesn't require much energy. On the other hand, your body uses fat and protein to build and repair tissue and make hormones.

Humans in the hunter-gatherer era survived thanks to metabolic flexibility — the body’s ability to use different fuels for energy depending on the nutrients available. This adaptation was vital during a time when the source, quantity, and frequency of food was uncertain[*]. Most of the time, people were fasting, so their bodies ran on ketones, not glucose.

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